How to Quit Your Job and Work from Home

Do you want to finish your day job and work from home full time?

One of the most exciting milestones for any solopreneur comes to the point where they are ready to finish your 9 to 5 job … and work as a full-time home-based business owner. The suspicion that many solopreneurs do? Complete their 9 to 5 jobs without a strategic plan in place to do it in the best possible way.

This is the case: if you give yourself two weeks’ notice and start working from home full-time without a strategic plan in place, you will solve problems like:

not knowing how to work from home productively,
not have a financial buffer and roster for customers, and / or
Do not have an action plan for how you will make the best use of your time after completing your day job.

One of the most exciting milestones for any solopreneur comes to the point where they are ready to finish your 9 to 5 job … and work as a full-time home-based business owner. The suspicion that many solopreneurs do? Complete their 9 to 5 jobs without a strategic plan in place to do it in the best possible way. This is the thing: if you give yourself two weeks’ notice and start working from home full time without a strategic plan in place, you will solve problems. | Think Creative Collective

What it all means is a warm mess of a company. It doesn’t sound that fun, does it now? After all, you do not want to end your day job, just to feel overwhelmed by the work from home!

And you really don’t want to be so stuck that you have to back pedal and return to 9 to 5 life. (What, unfortunately, is what inevitably happens to many sun-cleaners if they are not preparing to work at home full-time. It happened to me the first time I was trying to go full-time with my business too!)

Don’t worry – I’ve covered you!
Here are 5 important things you need to do before you stop your 9 to 5 job …
1. Create a business plan

Having a business plan should lay the foundation for your business. Think of your business plan as anchor for your business: it should be an organic living document that you often refer to when choosing what to focus on with your business.

Your business plan need not be anything super complex or filled with neat jargon. In fact, you should keep it simple and to that point.

In your business plan, you want to include things like:

Vision / mission statement
Business goals (I recommend 3 months, 6 months, 1 year and 3 year goals)
Perfect client / target audience
Services you offer
marketing
Budget

Because your business is likely to change quite over time, especially within your first year when deciding things, you want to make sure you have your business plan easily accessible so you can refer to it and make changes as you go.

I’ve found it good to leave the bottom third of each page even in my business plan so that, after I print it, I can get it on my desk within reach and make notes in pen or pen when my business plan changes. When the space gets a little busy with my handwritten notes, then I transfer these notes to the computer and print a new copy to work with!
2. Put together a catalog of potential customers

Creating a catalog of potential customers is a good place to start when you consider who you want to work with.

It is extremely valuable to put together an idealized client profile (something I focus on with my students!), But if you feel a bit firm, even printing a list of specific individuals / companies can help you get a better feel for who your ideal client is … AND it can give you a concrete list to start with when you start marketing your business.

Keep your catalog simple and straightforward: create a spreadsheet with the person’s name (and organization name, if they are part of a company), contact information, what service you offer that would suit your potential customer, why and how they can benefit services, what your current relationship status is with them and some ideas on how to reach them.

Please note that putting together your client directory means strategicization! The implementation of strategic plans is a fundamental part of your solopreneur business. You will not be pitching directly to these people – instead you want to build your relationships with them to create a solid foundation for when you are ready for the plan.
3. Assemble your personal action plan to finish your 9 to 5 job

I usually teach students how to finish their 9 to 5 jobs within three to six months. So, let’s say you choose a three month model: in that case, you have to break down the 12 weeks into weekly mini-goals, with daily steps that you can take to achieve each mini-goal.

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